Betty Clooney Center - Serving Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury Since 1983
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Betty Clooney Center

for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

The Betty Clooney Center (BCC), located near Los Angeles, California, has been serving the needs of persons with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) since 1983. The Center is a program of the Betty Clooney Foundation for Persons with Brain Injury. The Foundation was named in memory of Betty Clooney, who was Nick Clooney and Rosemary Clooney's younger sister, and the aunt of George Clooney. Betty died of an aneurysm in 1976.

As a result of Betty’s death, the Clooney family decided to establish a Brain Injury Center that addresses the needs of survivors of cognitive disabilities caused by traumatic brain injury, strokes, aneurisms, brain tumors, brain storms, brain cancer, and brain damage from trauma, age and other neurological injuries.

The Clooney family created a Center where a variety of rehabilitative classes, support groups, training events, vocational services, and assessments are provided to people who have sustained a traumatic brain injury.

The Betty Clooney Center for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury, a wonderful community organization, has been fortunate enough to have the help of family members of people with traumatic brain injury, volunteers, and TBI professionals from the medical, social service, cultural arts and therapeutic industries. If our website doesn’t answer your questions, please use the "Contact BCC" page to send us your questions.

Brain Injury Radio
Executive director David Morrissey, US International Council on Disabilities
Executive director David Morrissey, MPS the US International Council on Disabilities will speak about‘Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities CRPD) and the importance of it to all people with disabities now in 2014! The United States signed the CRPD in 2009. On December 4, 2012 the United States Senate considered the ratification of the CRPD but fell 5 votes short of the super majority vote required. The media coverage of the Senate's failure to ratify the disability treaty has been overwhelming and the CRPD's Senate leaders remain committed to bringing the disability treaty up in the 113th Congress. What is the “Disability Treaty?” The Disability Treaty (known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities,“CRPD”) is an international treaty that was inspired by U.S. leadership in recognizing the rights of people with disabilities. Why should the Senate vote for ratification? The Senate needs to fight for the 57.8 million Americans with disabilities, 5.5 million disabled American veterans, and the 1 billion people with disabilities around the world and vote to ratify the CRPD. Who supports ratification of the disability treaty? Ratification of the CRPD is supported by hundreds of disability organizations, civil rights groups, faith organizations, veterans groups, and major business groups including the Chamber of Commerce.

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